Archive for ‘links’

May 22, 2016

Of Interest (22 May, 2016)

Unsorted, but (unsurprisingly) mostly about empire and activism and books:

 

Shoaib Daniyal on the Hindu Right’s targeting of Akbar as a national symbol. I have my reservations about this piece (and rolling my eyes at “a Hindu Pakistan”) but mostly, yes.

All trees are the most superlative tree, but this is a pleasing map of superlative trees.

Charlotte Cooper on fat, the (UK, but also applicable elsewhere) left, and class.

Reading Claudia Rankine reading Adrienne Rich is a good thing.

Kavita Bhanot on Vedanta’s sponsorship of the London Jaipur Literature Festival, and more broadly, what the JLF does and means.

I have tried and failed to watch (sober) this alphabetical-order edit of The Wizard of Oz, but here it is for anyone unwise enough to wish to attempt it. (Via Debbie Reese on Twitter.)

Yasmeen Ismail on her I’m A Girl.

Abigail Nussbaum on Sofia Samatar’s The Winged Histories.

I’m (pleasantly? maybe?) surprised this piece on drone operator PTSD and child soldiers by Laurie Calhoun doesn’t reference Ender’s Game.

Ntina Tzouvala on Eye in the Sky, drones, and the law.

I’d never seen these clips of Janelle Monáe interviewing Nichelle Nichols but look (and look)! (If there’s a longer version available anywhere, please let me know!)

Via Sandeep Parmar, this interview (by Fred Johnson) with Forrest Gander.

Catherine Baker on the geo/politics of this year’s Eurovision.

Jaymee Goh on Southeast Asian steampunk, editing The Sea Is Ours, space, worldbuilding, #OwnVoices. Several things; it’s a good paper!

Frank B. Wilderson III on Afro-pessimism is v. good, and I want to come back to it.

 

 

May 15, 2016

Of Interest (15 May, 2016)

 

Bodies in the world:

Ruby Tandoh on clean eating and the wellness industry.

I love Your Fat Friend and you should read all her things. This recent piece is good.

Rinaldo Walcott on the decision to put an image of Harriet Tubman on the US $20 bill.

Morgan Jenkins on “Lemonade”, healing and community.

Paul Gilroy interviewed by Rosemary Bechler on activism, location, universities.

Antonia Randolph and the necessity of spaces for black vulnerability.

 

Books and film in the world:

I have such mixed feelings about Film Crit Hulk (they don’t use Hulk-ish linguistic ticks at all, other than the allcaps, and said allcaps is exhausting for me to read at length) but this, on cinematic language, is good and relevant to my genre interests.

Two Black Panther links: Evan Narcisse on the politics of the character (via Kajori Sen) and Rebecca Wanzo on the high stakes involved in Coates’ and Marvel’s versions (via Rukmini Pande).

Keguro Macharia thinking through African poetry. (See also Aaron Bady, here)

This year’s SF count at Strange Horizons. See also this piece about it by Niall Harrison (bonus: several Guardian commentors explaining that women don’t read or write much SF and why can’t we make Romance a more gender-balanced genre instead?)

May 8, 2016

Of Interest (8 May, 2016)

It’s been a while! Links this week are loosely divided into actual categories.

 

Books:

This interview with Jessa Crispin is perfect. (Also see Crispin on the self-hating book critic.)

Kei Miller on the unbearable (or stupid and limited) whiteness of the Forward Prize.

Vicky Smith at Kirkus on the White Default and mentioning race in children’s book reviews.

Chris Taylor on the legacy (afterlife?) of C.L.R. James’s The Black Jacobins.

 

Empire, maps, the structure of the world:

Rohit Gupta on the shape of the planet.

Karina Puente’s gorgeous illustrated Invisible Cities.

This record of correspondence between B.R. Ambedkar and W.E.B. Du Bois is doing wonderful things to my heart.

Tressie McMillan-Cottom on Anne-Marie Slaughter’s trickle-down feminism.

Subhas Rai and Himal’s right-side-up map of South Asia. Great at all times, but particularly in times like these.

Maps of the end of the world, by Allison Meier.

Great moments in apartheid, and also the use of language.

 

Film/TV:

Samira Nadkarni being brilliant on Captain America: Civil War. I’m finding the disgust of most people I know who’ve seen the film cathartic, post-AoU; as Marina Berlin points out here, this probably has to do with the fact that it’s released outside the US first, so the critical discourse hasn’t (yet) been dominated by people steeped in US-centric imperialism. (Then again, it’s probably also because I’ve shut out the voices of people who might disagree on this.)

Salman Adil Hussain on the women Zindagi Gulzar Hai imagines.

Rukmini Pande on racism and erasure in fandom, after recent Star Wars: The Force Awakens related badness. (You should read Rukmini’s twitter, also; she’s continued to say good and important things since storifying this.)

Harneet Singh’s interview with Gulzar is full of great moments, particularly the bit about his children’s songs.

 

April 17, 2016

Of Interest (16 April, 2016)

Unsorted (spot the themes though):

 

Via Darran Anderson, this piece by Christopher Turner on utopianism in architecture.

You have probably read this already but just in case: Sara Ahmed interviews Judith Butler, and they are both great and therefore this is also pretty great. (Link goes to a PDF)

Danika Parikh on Zac Goldsmith’s attempts (i.e. Modi, Hinduism, islamophobia) to reach out to British Indians.

Joe Macaré interviews Walidah Imarisha here. (Via Josh Kitto)

Long, impressive piece on B.R. Ambedkar, by Pratap Bhanu Mehta.

Tiara Jante interviews Rasheedah Phillips (of Black Quantum Futurism and The Afrofuturist Affair) here.

The Ladies Finger on recent events in Kashmir.

Naben Ruthnum watches DDLJ, his first Bollywood film. (I too identify with nearly being driven away from the films by Lata Mangeshkar.)

Shaheen Ahmed on the erasure of Assam’s syncretic traditions.

At We Are Wakanda, a review of the new Black Panther.

An extract from Minnie Vaid’s The Ant in the Ear of the Elephant.

Timothy Yu on the (a) problem with “Have They Run Out Of Provinces Yet?” (Via Sandeep Parmar)

Shruti Ravindran is fantastic, this piece on two Mumbai biologists and the natural wonders of Aarey Milk Colony is fantastic.

Sharon Irani interviews Appupen about Rashtraman and his recent work.

Nathan K. Hensley on drones, empire, space.

Via Keguro Macharia, Vijay Prashad on international scrutiny of caste-based violence, and India’s response to this.

Gautam Bhatia on Ambedkar’s revolutionary constitution.

 

April 3, 2016

Of Interest (3 April, 2016)

Unsorted:

Two (or possibly three) interviews with Victor LaValle: a conversation with Lincoln Michel that is spread out across here and here, and another with Samuel Sattin at the Rumpus, here.

Namwali Serpell on Nnedi Okorafor and Afrofuturism.

Shing Yin Khor on food, authenticity and appropriation.

A profile of Naezy, a young Muslim rapper in Mumbai, by Bhanuj Kappal.

Decolonizing Knowledge and the Question of the Archive, an ebook by Professor Achille Mbembe, at Africa is a Country.

An interview (by Tom Lamont) with Laura Mvula, about anxiety and success and her new album.

Via Subashini Navaratnam, this piece on the use of African fractals in the building of Benin City.

On Bhisham Sahni’s Tamas: Nilanjana Roy, here, and Jai Arjun Singh, here.

Ijeoma Oluo on not always loving your body.

Sofia Samatar being correct on the subjects of Gormenghast and fantasy and language (and I nearly cried at this piece because yes)

Megan Milks on personal pronouns, being “we”, subjectivity.

This interview with Sarnath Banerjee (by Ratik Asokan) is great and annoying in equal parts and therefore very good indeed.

March 20, 2016

Of Interest (20 March, 2016)

Unsorted:

Nisi Shawl’s crash course in Black SF history.

Supriya Nair interviews Sunil Khilnani about his new book, Incarnations.

I’ve come to Doreen Massey’s work very recently (I wasn’t expecting space/landscape to play as big a part in my research as it has come to do); here’s “Landscape/space/politics“.

Sharanya Manivannan on the Karaikal Ammaiyar approach to existing in public.

Look at these glorious freshwater crabs. Look at them all colourful and smiley.

John d’Addario on Gran Fury. Via Chapati Mystery.

A Helen Oyeyemi interview (with Lauren Oyler) in which she continues to say good things. Via Aaron Bady.

Eric M. Gurevitch on Handsome Nanda, the Therigatha, and empathetic criticism, feat. a Very Long Footnote. Via Nilanjana Roy.

Amit Chaudhuri on Rhodes Must Fall.

Fandom Following’s Wendy on Personal Favourite White Boys and Problematic Faves. Via Rukmini Pande.

Ramzi Fawaz on diverse mutants and superheroes, the hollowness of some current “diversity” discourse, and a much more nuanced reading of Umapagan Ampikaipakan’s infamous column than most of the outraged responses I’ve seen. Via Niall Harrison.

And via Fawaz’s piece, this good thing, by Alexandro Segarde.

Vinay Lal on Godse, the RSS and the murder of Gandhi. Via Bhuvi Gupta.

China Miéville on social sadism.

I meant to link to this weeks ago: Aman Sethi on the Jat agitation, water and the economy.

(Finally a self-plug) Here is a roundtable on South Asianness, folklore, etc., featuring Arun Jiwa, Suna Dasi, Vajra Chandrasekera, Laila Borrie, Shveta Thakrar, Sukhbir Cheema and me.

March 13, 2016

Of Interest (13 March, 2016)

Unsorted links about SF and empire and race:

 

Debbie Reese collects responses to J.K. Rowling’s “History of Magic in North America”.

Roz Kaveney in the TLS is insightful about Tolkien and also voices some of my frustrations with much of the Tolkien criticism I’ve read.

Phenderson Djèlí Clark has some fantastic black history and SF essays on his blog (and you should read them all, obviously), here’s one on SF and racial terror.

Esther Wang on the appeal of fictional worlds where everyone is white. (I feel this essay so hard.)

Vajra Chandrasekera has a new column at Strange Horizons, of which this is the first installment, and it’s great (and advocates blowing things up; I do like this man). His recent review of Binti is also fantastic.

K2 on colonial settlers in The Revenant. (Fun fact! Apparently Grace Dove wasn’t invited to the Oscars.)

Sofia Samatar’s “Notes Toward a Theory of Quantum Blackness” is beautiful; the things it links to and references are vital.

Rega Jha on only one of a long history of atrocities perpetuated on Indian culture by our colonial overlords. Via Sunny Singh.

Andrew Yang on Ken Liu’s The Grace of Kings.

Dr. André M. Carrington, whose book I’m very eager to read, interviewed here by Noah Berlatsky. Via Matthew Cheney.

The Ramayana in Persian (an extract from a book by Audrey Truschke), and a Persian Mahabharata (Yael Rice, via bint battuta)

Aaron Bady on A. Igoni Barrett’s Blackass.

February 28, 2016

Of Interest (28 February, 2016)

Rohith Vemula/JNU/India/This Cultural Moment:

How Delhi Police put out our candlelight vigil for Rohith.

Asha Kowtal on the insidious decentring of caste from the discourse. “Because our history is being distorted even before it is fully formed.” (Via Amba Azaad.)

In recent weeks I’ve kept linking to things Ravish Kumar says/does because he’s great; here’s an interview.

A photo essay in the Caravan by Nikhil Roshan, as a group of JNU students waited to be arrested.

Lawrence Liang on Gandhi, Tagore and Anti/Nationalism.

 

Books:

This awards season, remember the Gold Star Awards (and be glad that the Mongrel Coalition Against Gringpo exists and is in the world)

Claudia Rankine is interviewed here by Lauren Berlant and some good things are said. (Via Kawrage on twitter.)

Sarah Howe is interviewed by Greg McCartney, and she also says good things. (Via Sandeep Parmar.)

Ethan Robinson reviews Nancy Jane Moore’s The Weave, and in the process also offers a reading of the entire genre, and of assumptions in fiction in general, that I’d find useful and important even if a) he wasn’t a friend b) I hadn’t edited this.

Smriti Daniel on the Noolaham Digital Library.

Kuzhali Manickavel’s continued explorations into SF on the radio are still great. “It is neat how advice about sex can also be advice about interacting with aliens.” (Via Blaft)

E.R. Truitt (whose book sounds relevant to the interests of many who read this) on our imaginary North.

Adam Roberts on the wrath of Achilles John Wick.

Nayomi Munaweera is author-photographed twice.

 

 

February 21, 2016

Of Interest (21 February, 2016)

 

Sedition/JNU/Being Anti-National/Campus politics and the state:

 

Kanhaiya Kumar’s speech (translated from Hindi), before he was arrested.

Rahi Gaikwad on caste and the nation. (Via Mridula Chari)

Puja Sen in Himal on what all of this says about the party in power.

Jamall Calloway connecting Rohith Vemula’s death to a wider system of global oppressions. (Via Shruti Iyer)

(via Aakshi Magazine,) Mohamad Junaid on freedom of expression, the space of the campus, what the current narrative centres and what it erases. This, in particular:

The same day frothing TV journalists were holding court martials against Umar Khalid and Kanhaiya Kumar, the news of Shaista’s and Danish’s cold blooded murders was quietly suppressed—part of a larger history of suppression, which makes a certain kind of “national conscience” possible in India.

Swara Bhaskar writes to Umar Khalid.

David Palumbo-Liu on the possible ramifications in the US of what’s happening at home. (Via Chris Taylor)

Atul Dev in conversation with Vikram Chauhan, the lawyer who led the attacks on students and journalists outside Patiala House.

Nayan Jyoti points out that the state’s repression of the university just happens to be taking place at the same time as it suppresses workers across Haryana and Rajasthan. (TW for pictures of injuries, possibly)

Meanwhile, Dalit activists seeking permission to fly a black flag are arrested.

Shuddhabrata Sengupta on Ambedkar, Tagore and the Nation State.

In the most charming of all possible responses, the university has been hosting public talks on nationhood and they’re all available at the Stand With JNU Youtube page here (schedule here).

A performance of Dastan-e-Sedition.

A tweet by Anupam Kher, actor and tolerant Indian. (At least till someone explains to him about Nazis and he deletes it; though right now he seems to stand by it):

And Ravish Kumar on NDTV with this searing piece of reportage/performance art (on the channel’s website here) about the current state of our news media.

February 14, 2016

Of Interest (14 February, 2016)

Unsorted because I’m on holiday:

Kate Schapira on bodies and science and the world and bringing people into it.

Keguro Macharia on living with Jess Row’s Your Face in Mine. (Disclaimer because I edited this; on the other hand, it’s wonderful and everyone should read it.)

Sophia Azeb on the Tate Britain’s Artist and Empire exhibition.

Timothy Burke on Uagadou and the mechanics of African wizarding schools.

Ruchika Sharma on the origins of the Bhojshala myth.

Anuradha Vikram on witches and anti-colonial botany. Via Karen Gregory.

Soraya Roberts on Winona Ryder. Via Anna Carey.

Debbie Chachra on maker culture and the forms of work it excludes or devalues.

A roundtable (feat. Naomi Zeichner, Doreen St Felix, Anupa Mistry and Judnick Mayard) on Beyoncé’s “Formation“. Via Kate Schapira.

“and next thing you know the State has sponsored a musical warning people about you.” Creatrix Tiara on decolonization, western activism, other complicated things. Via Shruti Iyer.

A Dalit Marxist Manifesto by Chittibabu Padavala.

Edit: And this gorgeous piece on urban India, imagining love, and cinema, by Ravish Kumar. In Hindi here, translated into English here.