August 21, 2016

Of Interest (21 August, 2016)

Unsorted:

 

I could link to all of Your Fat Friend’s posts, but here is one in defense of fat sadness, via Ekaterina Sedia.

Dhrubo Jyoti on the savarna media’s coverage of caste violence.

Nandini Krishnan at The Ladies Finger on gender and abuse in Indian theatre.

I’m still reading this, by Jacob Silverman, on software and privacy and surveillance, but I’m finding it useful to think with.

This baffling story on metafilter, involving two hapless protagonists and a lot of cheese. As you read through the comments and finally receive the whole story, you discover that it too is a story about privacy and surveillance. And also cheese. (Via Erin Horakova)

No one who has met me will be surprised by my love of these photographs by Mirko Nahmijas. Give me all the huge, brutalist buildings.

Related–this Owen Hatherley reading list about Soviet architecture.

Sarah Blackwood on childbirth and “empowerment”.

Kathleen Jamie on Brexit, conservation, anger. Via Sridala Swami.:

Because I’m angry I can’t see straight. Literally. By ‘see’ I mean ‘attend’. My relationship with the natural world has been knocked all to hell. After years of trying to train my eye and attune my ear to nature, to notice and make it matter, to know that everything we have and do derives ultimately from the Earth, and to write accordingly – it’s all taken a hit.

Katie Matlack on Caster Semenya, Dutee Chand, and the gender policing of women in sports.

Sharda Ugra on Dipa Karmakar, PV Sindhu and Sakshi Malik.

Rosa Lyster on getting clothes in books wrong.

Arup K. Chatterjee on cow vigilantism and colonial rule. Via Alok Prasanna Kumar.

I’ve been following the discussion of e.E. Charlton-Trujillo’s When We Was Fierce and the many issues with its invented language. Meanwhile I’m about to read Alex Wheatle’s Liccle Bit and Crongton Knights, and in the context of all those things, this interview with Wheatle, about his invented language, is really interesting.

August 14, 2016

Of Interest (14 August, 2016)

 

Unsorted because I did a tonne of work today:

Flavia Dzodan (pause while we all give thanks that Flavia is writing things on the internet again) on having a phrase become a meme, capitalism, compensation.

Cheryl Wollner interviews Megan Milks.

Phenderson Djèlí Clark on the Fireside Report and submitting to SF markets as a black writer.

Kelly Hayes on “the little girls who may now believe that they too could be president one day.”

Mildly concerned that this piece by Ben Panko has a tagline from a cheesy movie, but that is the world we are in now.

Molly Smith on the links between criminalisation and violence against sex workers.

Maya Goodfellow on misogynoir and attacks on Diane Abbott.

Janet Stickmon advises aliens on creating a library of books with black characters for children.

Brendan Byrne on Sophia Al-Maria’s Black Friday.  (Related, Al-Maria’s “The Gaze of Sci-Fi Wahabi“)

Gee Imaan Semmalar on the various problems with India’s recent bill for the protection of trans people’s rights.

Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib on Frank Ocean’s deferred album, thirst and performative longing.

Praveen Gopal Krishnan on immigration, property and precarity in the Gulf.

Nisi Shawl, Ayana Jamieson and Cauleen Smith discuss the legacy of Octavia Butler.

Some good things in the South Asian Writing special issue of 91st Meridian, but these Uday Prakash poems, translated by Roomy Naqvy, are my favourite.

I haven’t thought through this piece on the futures of nuclear criticism by Daniel Cordle yet, but there is much there that is relevant to my interests and probably yours as well.

August 12, 2016

Crystal Chan, Bird

After complaining about the whiteness of the Carnegie award for three years in a row now, I’ve been trying to find recent children’s books, by non-white authors, that might have been on the shortlist (or even the longlist) in other circumstances. Would Bird have been eligible for the medal? I’m not sure—it was shortlisted for the Waterstones children’s book prize this year, but I suspect that, if it was eligible at all, it would have been so for last year’s Carnegie, since it first came out in 2014. (To further complicate matters, one of the rules for the prize is also that if published elsewhere first, the book must be published in the UK within three months, and that can be difficult to work out.)

Jewel is twelve, and knows that the home she lives in is an unhappy one. On the day of her birth her older brother, then five, tried to “fly” from the local cliff and plummeted to his death. Since then her birthday has been marked by mourning, her parents unhappy and still blaming one another; and her grandfather, who gave John the nickname “bird” and who blames himself for his death, has not spoken since it happened. Jewel’s multiracial family is also something of an oddity in her small Iowa town; her father’s family are Jamaican, while her mother is half-Mexican. Her father, always superstitious, has forbidden her to go near the cliff, and futilely attempts to grow non-native plants in their garden in order to ward off duppies. Her mother is worried and distracted and would like her daughter to have safer and less extraordinary thoughts and ambitions.

But then Jewel meets John, a boy her own age who is visiting his uncle for the summer, and everything changes. John is fascinated by astronomy in the way that Jewel is by geology; they are awed and respectful of one another’s knowledge, show each other their own particular haunts and secret places, and share some of the complexities of their respective families (John is black, and adopted, and has complicated feelings about his adopted [white] parents). Jewel’s initial discomfort over the coincidence (or is it?) of John’s name being that of her brother soon dissipates, but her grandfather refuses to accept John’s entry into his home.

It’s clear to the reader, if not to Jewel (for a surprisingly long time) that her grandfather believes John to be a duppie—whether or not he is justified in this belief is less clear. Jewel and John’s friendship begins rather eerily—John is a common enough name, but long before the grandfather’s suspicions enter the picture the reader is wondering about his connection to Jewel’s lost brother. Until we know what genre of book we’re reading, we can’t know who or what John really is. There’s much about Bird that teeters on the brink of the supernatural in any case—its spectacular landscapes, the exaggerated (but not, because it’s entirely plausible) extreme of the man who has been silent for over a decade are all there to invoke—if not the strictly SFFnal—a sense of wonder, or the possibility of wonder. Jewel has created a set of rituals for herself involving the rocks she arranges at the top of the cliff, and there too, the reader is left half-believing in them. And Jewel and John’s respective hobbies mean that we’re full alive to the vastness of astronomical space and geological time.

Supernatural (or not) overtones aside, a thing that Bird does particularly well is a set of real, complex, and often awful relationships. The book informs me that the author also grew up as a mixed-race kid (though in Wisconsin, not Iowa) and some of the complexities of Jewel’s situation are presumably drawn from experience. But there are difficult things here (that are hopefully not drawn from experience) and in dealing with them Chan is largely precise and kind. Jewel’s family do, at some level, all love one another, but grief has affected the individual people involved (in varied and complicated ways), as well as the dynamics of their relationships; the impact of that grief is never trivialised and can’t be fully resolved. The book in this aspect is well-named; the shadow of Bird/John’s death lies heavy over the characters. It’s hard to imagine an uncomplicatedly happy ending for this family that doesn’t first involve years of consciously working towards it. But of course “and things were complicated for several years afterwards” isn’t really a satisfying plot structure, and Bird obtains what structure it has from two particular relationships: Jewel and John, who are friends, face conflict, and have to learn to forgive one another; and Jewel and her grandfather, who she has never heard speak in all the 12 years of her life. The second of these is by far the more complicated—and if they’re both a bit too easy and too pat, they’re counterbalanced by still existing in a world where very little else is easy.

And yet, despite all the things about Bird that I like very much, I’m not sure whether I think it works well as a whole object. I applaud its lack of easy resolution and its refusal to simplify its world, but much of what’s going on in the background, however well drawn, feels a bit directionless. I keep changing my mind—either I think it’s got a clever slice-of-life feel to it (here is some stuff that happened over this summer, but life will go on, slightly altered, for these characters; that’s the story) or it’s a bit baggy and slack.

August 7, 2016

Of Interest (7 August, 2016)

Here are some things that I read this week.

 

Race/Empire:

A Vision For Black Lives.  Via Christina Sharpe.

Lori Lee Oates on empire and the commercialisation of alternative religion. (It’s not an argument that has space to examine the uneven ways in which things like yoga work in their homelands, but as long as we’re all remembering that that too is a thing…)

I enjoyed this roundtable about terminology in the UK, though I’m not sure why it’s in two parts. (Via Nikesh Shukla, who’s in it.)

Gurminder K. Bhambra on Britishness, empire, brexit, class.

In the wake of this week’s BLM demonstration in London, the context of Jimmy Mubenga’s death feels particularly important to remember.

An interview with Mariame Kaba on prison abolition, race, violence. Via Molly Smith.

 

Books:

Dexter Palmer in conversation with J.D. Schnepf.

I also enjoyed this interview with Metropolarity.

Trisha Gupta in Asymptote on Sangeeta Bandyopadhyay’s Panty.

Robin Ngangom on Pijush Dhar and Shillong. Via Nandini Ramachandran.

Kate Schapira and Valerie Witte in conversation.

Malcolm Harris on China Mieville’s Last Days of New Paris.

 

August 1, 2016

July Reading

A good month for reading, if not for the world in general.

 

Crystal Chan, Bird: A children’s book that I rather liked. Chan’s MG novel about friendship and family is a bit uneven and its mysteries aren’t particularly mysterious, but it’s full of big, sweeping ideas and clever little details, and I found that I really enjoyed it. I’ll be writing more about it soon.

Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda, Monstress, #1-6: Whenever I begin a new series I seem to find myself complaining that there’s not enough included in the first issue for me to get into it and decide if I want to continue. Liu and Takeda’s series begins with a huge first issue, and I bought the next five as soon as I’d finished reading it. It’s a big, meaty, sweeping epic fantasy, with hints of huge, inaccessible back story, elements of the just plain weird, almost all the named characters are women, and it’s just satisfying in the ways that secondary world fantasies with chosen-one teenagers and talking cats tend to be. Takeda’s art is beautiful, and the sheer level of detail adds, again, to the sense of the depth of this world.

Jonathan Baird, Kevin Costner and Rick Ross, The Explorers Guild: There isn’t really an appropriate emotion for finding yourself reading a book apparently co-authored by Kevin Costner and enjoying it (though obviously celebrities are people too, and may have interests and talents beyond the ones they’re famous for). I’ll be reviewing this elsewhere–as you’d expect, with a 700+ page imitation imperial adventure novel that keeps asking you to compare it to Kipling (and other reviewers have obliged wholeheartedly) my feelings are many and varied; c.f. my well-documented love of solar topis.

Alice Pung, Laurinda: A school story in which a poor, Chinese-Cambodian teenager wins a scholarship to an exclusive girls’ school. Scholarship student stories are a time-honoured tradition within the school story and I’m hoping, soon, to read this against that genre–and alongside Dear Mrs. Naidu and Robin Stevens’s Wells and Wong books. Soon. For now, I liked it.

Innosanto Nagara, A is for activist: I was in London for a few days, and Erin led me astray into Housmans on a day when something I’d expected to spend a lot of money on had turned out to be free and I was feeling reckless. Result: several books, including things from Stuart Hall’s library, and this board book, which I loved. The art is great, there are several cats, and the entry for “N” is “No”.

Joan Aiken, All But A Few, The People in the Castle: Apparently (I learn from Lizza Aiken’s acknowledgements in another Aiken collection, The Monkey’s Wedding), John Clute has created a bibliography of all of Aiken’s short stories–and there are more than five hundred of them out there in the wild. I suppose I’m glad that such a thing exists, but I’ve always read Aiken in haphazard collections, with occasional surprise repeated stories, and a larger sense that there would always be more, unlimited, Aiken to discover. The People in the Castle is a version of a “best of” anthology, so there are stories I was already familiar with; some of them showed up again in All But A Few when I read it immediately after. But most of each collection was completely new, and all of them astonishingly good. I’ve never yet succeeded in articulating what it is about Aiken that makes her work so good (though if anyone wanted someone to review The People in the Castle, hi, I’d like to) but to read “Watkyn, Comma” or “A Portable Elephant” really is to be in the presence of genius.

 

July 31, 2016

Of Interest (31 July, 2016)

I’m slowly, tentatively, beginning to look through all the things I saved and didn’t read over the last couple of months, when too much was happening (globally, personally) to take things in. I don’t know if that means that the next few weeks of links round-ups will be unusually dense or the opposite.

 

The world:

At Scroll.in I had some preliminary thoughts on maps and fantasy and Pokémon Go. I’m hoping to expand this when I’ve thought about it more, perhaps, and it will be on the blog when I’ve done so. But I link in the piece to this essay by Keisha E. McKenzie, which is good and which you should read.

Amitav Ghosh interviewed by Nayantara Narayanan, on most art’s failure to confront climate change. I am looking forward to this book; I already know what I want to read it alongside, which is exciting in itself.

Kate Schapira on a “new” whale.

JR on flags, raising them, bringing them down.

Robbie Shilliam on racism and brexit–I found his distiction between biculturalism and multiculturalism in particular very useful to think with.

Nikesh Shukla on the “isolated incidents” that we’re being told to dismiss.

Colin Dickey on the genderedness of spiritualist tradition and Ghostbusters.

Ishan Marvel follows the Yamuna in Delhi.

 

 

Books in the world:

Fireside’s report on the dearth of published short science fiction by black writers is damning, and needs to be read.

Sam Wallman’s So Below, a comic about land and space.

Kim Reynolds on left-wing interwar children’s literature.

Arshia Sattar remembers A.K. Ramanujan.

Matthew Cheney on living/reading/writing through the AIDS crisis.

Keguro Macharia on queer truncation; in a column, and then a review.

(Both Macharia pieces from Strange Horizons‘s Our Queer Planet month, which also featured a review of Cheney’s collection: Week 1; Week 2; Week 3; Week 4–other favourites include a story by Vajra Chandrasekera, a review of Steven Universe by Erin Horakova, an interview with O Horvath.)

July 31, 2016

Mathangi Subramanian, Dear Mrs. Naidu

Today’s post features a children’s book not from the Carnegie shortlist (and not eligible, though it would have been had it been written during the prize’s earliest years). But (since I’ve been thinking so much about the prizing of children’s literature recently) it did win a recent South Asia Book Award and was shortlisted for the Hindu Young World-Goodbooks award (and I’ll be reviewing the winning book sometime this year).

Sarojini is twelveNaidu. She lives in a colony where the houses don’t have permanent roofs (an image I loved was that of a neighbour whose house was covered by the canvas billboard hoarding from a local politician’s election campaign–the councillor had promised development) and goes to a government school where some teachers maintain discipline by hitting their students while others speak of expanding hearts and minds. One of the latter sort has set Sarojini an assignment–to write a series of letters to someone she’d like to get to know. Sarojini picks Sarojini Naidu,  freedom fighter, child prodigy, and Sarojini’s namesake (she’s never heard the term before, but a local lawyer says Naidu’s hers). Obviously Mrs. Naidu is dead, which is a matter to be treated with some delicacy in the actual letters.

Sarojini also faces something of a crisis when her best friend Amir moves away. Amir’s brothers have got good jobs, and now the family can afford a small flat. More importantly, Amir himself is now a scholarship student at a reputable private school. Sarojini’s discovery of the Right to Education act seems like the solution to all of her problems–it may mean a way for Sarojini to join Amir’s new school, or it may at least provide her with a way of making her own school better.

It would be so easy for this to turn into a 1980s TV-esque educational story–for perfectly legitimate plot reasons the characters spend a lot of time explaining the RTE to one another. In the acknowledgements Subramanian (no relation) refers to her research into the book as “fieldwork”, and describes sitting in the corner of a school “for almost two years, watching and asking questions”, which gives the whole thing a rather dubious anthropological feel. What we get instead, fortunately, is something like gritty realism (as far as that’s possible in something this light in tone)–a story about activism, and coming up against structures built to uphold the status quo, and the tiring/frustrating/rewarding work of getting things done. Discovering that admissions to the free slots in the local private school are dependent on bribes, and learning from Amir that being a poor student among rich classmates is harder than she’d realised, Sarojini focuses her attentions on another aspect of the RTE: the one that requires that government schools have basic resources; potable water and toilets and playgrounds and decent compound walls.

A thing that gives me pause is that this realism also flags up some goals as too hard or inconvenient to work towards. Yes, Sarojini might have a bad time of it in Amir’s school, and yes, fixing the public schools so that everyone (or at least everyone in this part of Bangalore) can benefit from them is a better and more sustainable solution, creating quality, free, alternatives to the private schools rather than rattling at their gates and hoping to be let in. One of the things my Carnegie reading group discussed while reading Robin Talley’s Lies We Tell Ourselves (a book about a completely different sort of segregation in schools) was the fact that, in that book, Sarah does feel occasional resentment that the politics of their families have meant she and her friends have to suffer this sort of abuse. (Lucy Pearson discusses the book here, and notes that Sarah’s parents are presented as oddly unconcerned by the danger their children are in.) Dear Mrs. Naidu is a lighter book for younger readers, and doesn’t make explicit the violence, structural and individual, that Talley’s book tries to invoke at a visceral level; yet it’s clear from Amir’s account of his new school that things aren’t exactly great–he will not turn down the opportunity, but it is going to cost him.

And yet Sarojini’s decision not to go to Greenhill, to instead allow the school a lovely PR opportunity to present Ambedkar School with a playground, though a pragmatic decision, is one that works out very conveniently for Greenhill. I was reminded, a little, of a recent struggle to gain admission in a local school for a child whose parents are janitors. In the face of indignation on twitter (see some of the replies to the linked tweet) and requests to name and shame the school, those involved chose not to, as the aim was to help the girl in question rather than punish or antagonise the schools. And it may well be the case that a pragmatic approach will yield better results than my own kneejerk anger, and yet. Dear Mrs. Naidu knows that under unequal conditions, progress is made by allowing the powerful to save face/look good (Sarojini’s turning of her campaign into a human interest story is crucial to its success), knows that when the poor muster together resources and make things for themselves (in this case a rebuilt and freshly-painted compound wall) they do so at a far greater cost to themselves.

I realized that I wasn’t proud.
I was angry.
Really angry.
Why should Deepti’s Appa and all the other workers have to miss a whole day of wages for something the government should be doing for free?

This is one of the few times in the book where Sarojini displays actual, real, anger, and I wish there was more of it. If there’s one aspect of the book’s (for want of a better word, though I don’t think I mean it as a criticism) didacticism that grates, it’s this; that it doesn’t allow for negative feelings like bitterness and rage–even Sarojini’s anger can only be of the most productive sort.

I find myself wondering how, in a book centred around “Ambedkar School,” caste is never explicitly mentioned. There are certainly various forms of bigotry at play among these characters–throwaway references to Amir’s family being Muslims, the chorus of local aunties who warn Sarojini away from Deepti, whose parents work on a construction site. I don’t know if there are signifiers that I’m missing; if not it’s a strange omission.

July 2, 2016

June Reading

Is this going to be another of those months where I disapprove of things? (Yes)

 

Elizabeth McKenzie, The Portable Veblen: I promised a friend I’d attend at least one of her Bailey’s prize shadowing book group sessions, and picked the last one largely because of this book. I’d seen it compared to Karen Joy Fowler’s work (which I love), there was an approving Ursula Le Guin blurb, and various other enthusiastic reviews (including this one from Jeff Vandermeer). It was probably inevitable that I’d be disappointed, and I was, a bit–as a social novel, with lots of exaggeratedly horrible characters, The Portable Veblen is successful; as the sort of thing that KJF does, it is not. I liked its joyous, over-the-top-ness, I liked every moment of Veblen and Paul attempting to figure out how to be those two people in a relationship; reading it against Hannah Rothschild’s The Improbability of Love (also for the abovementioned book group) I enjoyed the ways in which it was big and sweeping and comic in ways that felt stronger than Rothschild’s own invocation of those things. But at moments where I’d have wanted it to be weird it was twee, I wanted it to do more with its Thorstein Veblen references, and Veblen herself in particular embodies a particular sort of precious, whimsical whiteness that I’m strongly put off by. I feel more kindly disposed towards it than Abigail Nussbaum does here, but the comparison with Where’d You Go Bernadette?, which I hadn’t thought of, rings disappointingly true to me.

Patrick Ness, The Rest Of Us Just Live Here: Many (many) words on this here.

Marcus Sedgwick, The Ghosts of Heaven: Many words on this here. Both this and the Ness were a part of my Carnegie shortlist shadowing project.

Garth Nix, Goldenhand: Nix was in my city for a conference and I got to interview him (forthcoming from Strange Horizons!) and also to wheedle an ARC of the next Old Kingdom book out of him–and since I’d just reread the series for the interview, and have been a fan of the Old Kingdom since the 1990s, obviously I stayed up all night and read it immediately. I have many thoughts, but am saving them for a proper review in a couple of months.

Anna Breslaw, Scarlett Epstein Hates it Here: I seem to know a lot of people who deeply loved Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl (which is about a young woman who writes very successful fanfic) and have generally attributed the fact that it does nothing for me to my general lack of engagement with fandom. Breslaw’s book is also about a BNF in a fictional fandom but is so clumsy in its engagement with fan culture that it makes me appreciate Rowell’s book a lot more. Scarlett is a fan of a teenage werewolf drama, which is cancelled at the beginning of the book. Undaunted, Scarlett and her friends in fandom (the most popular writers) decide to keep writing fic set in this universe anyway. Scarlett makes this an excuse to write thinly-/not-at-all disguised versions of her schoolmates into a weird RPF that features a) sexbots and b) no werewolves at all and for some reason, rather than turning away in vague embarrassment the fandom decides to embrace this setting and it grows popular enough for there to be ship wars. Naturally, the principal characters (the Mean Girl who is the basis for the main sexbot, the popular boy Scarlett has a crush on) find out and things blow up.

There are the bones of a good book in this–Scarlett’s initial idolisation of her father’s Cultured-ness (vs her mother’s lack thereof), the ways this maps on to her assumptions about who is and is not culturally valuable, these make for thoughtful, nuanced character portraits, and I think the book is reaching for exactly this. But it’s awkward in its relationship to and unnecessary explanations of fandom (and what on earth is that moment when Scarlett is surprised that a writer of m/m slash is a woman???), trite in its discussion of middle-aged white man fiction (to make me want to defend Jonathan Franzen is quite a feat), just generally unimpressive.

 

June 24, 2016

Zen Cho, Spirits Abroad

I started reading Zen Cho’s collection of short fiction in that ancient past when it was only available as a paperback from Buku Fixi. By the time I actually got around to starting to review it, the ebook, with all its extra material, had come out, and naturally I wanted that as well. I promised Vector a review sometime in late 2014, and only delivered it sometime in 2015; luckily, they decided they’d like to carry it alongside a much more timely review of the author’s novel Sorceror to the Crown. (That review was by Maureen Kincaid Speller, and I’ll be linking to it when it’s available on her blog.)

 

**********************************************

Cho 1One of the difficulties with reviewing a book that exists in two separate editions is that in some crucial ways you might well be reviewing two different books. Zen Cho’s Spirits Abroad is a paperback published in Malaysia by maverick publisher Fixi Novo, consisting of ten short stories divided into sections titled “Here”, “There” and “Elsewhere”. Zen Cho’s Spirits Abroad is also an internationally-available ebook consisting of fifteen stories (divided into sections titled “Here”, “There”, “Elsewhere” and “Going Back”), as well as commentary from the author. The second of these is, naturally, the more readily available; the first is the original book, and all that added content in the ebook is classified under “extras”. The ebook as a form is flexible enough to make this possible, of course, and I’ll willingly accept all the fiction Cho is willing to give me, but it’s hard to see this much added material as merely supplementary.

Place is important here, as those section headings show. The three stories that make up “Here” are all set entirely in Malaysia; “There” consists of four stories of Malaysians in the UK. There’s an implicit statement being made about where this book’s cultural centre is, about what is normal and what is strange. It’s a statement that chimes with Fixi Novo’s manifesto, published at the front of the (paper) book, in which they pledge, among other things, that they “will not use italics for non-American, non-English terms. This is because those words are not foreign to a Malaysian audience […] italics are a form of apology.” As the necessity for such a manifesto indicates, globally, English language fiction (including SFF) is still dominated by a sense of the West as cultural centre, so that even for those of us from (or in) other parts of the world, placing ourselves in that position can feel a bit radical. Here, if there’s a culture that needs to explain or justify itself it’s that belonging to England, not Malaysia. (“‘People brought sambal?’ Hui Ann noticed people hastily squirrelling away jars of dark red paste. ‘You brought that all the way from home? Eh, here in England they also got food one, you know or not?’ ‘I don’t like fish and chip,’ said one of the sambal smugglers defiantly.”) More usually, though, Cho draws on both cultural sources, the “here” and the “there”, as do her characters who realistically, because that is what the world is like, inhabit them both. One of my favourite moments in “The House of Aunts” comes when Ah Lee, its protagonist, has revealed her supernatural identity to the boy on whom she has a crush, and asks him “You want to say it? You want to tell me what am I?”  It’s funny because it’s an inversion of a similar scene in Twilight (one of “The House of Aunts”‘ more obvious intertexts); it’s great because so much of what is good about the story rests on the precise differences between “vampire”, the western cultural concept both of these teenagers are relatively comfortable talking about, and “pontianak”, which is what Ah Lee really is.

Two of the stories in the collection have supplementary stories included as ebook extras. “The Persistence of Angela’s Past Life” takes a side character from “Prudence and the Dragon”, Prudence’s best friend Angela, and gives her a back story that not only fleshes out these characters and their history but reframes the original story as well—the reader of “The Persistence of Angela’s Past Life” is reading a different “Prudence and the Dragon” entirely. This may all seem obvious; of course stories exist in relation to one another, and of course increased knowledge of a world/context changes how we read the stories it contains. But all this is also crucial to Cho’s larger project—this opening up of the worlds that we “know” and reminding the reader that other characters, other stories, already exist (have always existed) within them. It’s most evident in her dealing with British history; in Sorcerer to the Crown, in her romance novella The Perilous Life of Jade Yeo, and in this collection in “起狮,行礼 (Rising Lion – The Lion Bows)”, a story about a ghost-busting Lion Dance troupe in England, hired to exorcise a haunted cabinet. The ghost in question turns out to be a small African child, a legacy of British imperial history, whom the troupe choose to adopt, even if it means carrying an unwieldy cabinet around forever after.

cho 2The “Going Back” section of the collection, exclusive to the ebook, rather destabilises the tidy geographical demarcation of the “original” book. If Here, There and Elsewhere are Malaysia, Britain and fantastic (or SFnal) spaces respectively, from where and to where does one return? All three of the stories in this section are set in Malaysia, but they speak of other sorts of return as well. “The Fish Bowl” revisits adolescence, “Balik Kampung” involves a return to the world of the living. (“The Many Deaths of Hang Jebat” revisits myth and Cho’s fanfiction roots, possibly, or may be where this neat reading breaks down). But the theme of homecoming bookends the main body of the book as well—it’s as integral to “The First Witch of Damansara” (which opens Here) as it is to the closing section of “The Four Generations of Chang E” (with which Elsewhere closes). “Balik kampung” (returning to the village), Cho explains in her notes to the story of that name, is a tradition “embedded in the urban Malaysian psyche”; it’s tempting to read this theme of return, the impossibility of return, and the various inconveniences encountered in the attempt, as equally embedded in this collection.

Those same story notes, however, left me conflicted. On the one hand, it’s fantastic that the ebook allows the author to annotate and provide extra information about the stories and their genesis—whether or not that information is particularly helpful. For example I’m not sure “The Earth Spirit’s Favourite Anecdote”, which works mainly by being told in a really charming tone, is much improved by the information that it’s Legolas/Gimli slash, as amused as I was by this fact—whereas the revelation that “The Many Deaths of Hang Jebat” is a “five things” story changes everything. Too often, though, the notes take a tone that feels to me contradictory to the joyous, unapologetic spirit of the book—they explain. The presumed reader of the ebook, unlike the presumed reader of the paperback, has to be told what Balik kampung means culturally rather than knowing/inferring/being content in their ignorance; needs to be reminded not to read “Chang E” as “the one true narrative of diaspora”. And if such a reader needs to have it explained to them that “First National Forum on the Position of Minorities in Malaysia”, the best story in the collection with its crotchety, vulnerable old lady protagonist and its deadpan reporting of committee proceedings, is supposed to be funny, then they do not deserve to read it. It’s tempting to read the inclusion of the notes as a reflection of the ebook’s wider audience; in reality, they’re probably just there because the format allowed them to be.

In part because of her constant engagement with earlier literature, Cho has tended to attract the Author X + Author Y sort of review (“Susanna Clarke plus Georgette Heyer–with a soupçon of P.G Wodehouse and infused with the Mitford sister of your choice”). I feel guilty for adding to it, but I’m just going to come out and say it—a good Zen Cho story has the charm and the precision of a good Joan Aiken story. And there are several good Zen Cho stories in this collection.

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June 20, 2016

Frances Hardinge, The Lie Tree (and general remarks on the Carnegie shortlist)

I read The Lie Tree in February and didn’t write about it at the time; I’d hoped to have found the time for a proper reread while discussing and writing about the Carnegie shortlist but when is there ever time for anything? As a result, the book I think might most reward discussion is the one I’m writing about least. It seems unfair.

The Lie Tree opens in a Victorian world similar to but not quite our own–one of the people with whom I discussed the book compared this setting, and its treatment, to that of Joan Aiken’s Wolves books, and that comparison works well for me.

Faith Sunderly and her family are in the middle of a rather hurried move to the channel island of Vane. Faith’s father, a reverend and a natural scientist, is an acknowledged expert in fossils; he has been invited to Vane to help excavate the caves on the island. That’s the official story; Faith knows very well that her father isn’t in the habit of taking his family on these research trips. It soon becomes clear that the Sunderlys have left England for a reason–rumours are flying about the authenticity of the Reverend Sunderly’s research, particularly of one particular fossil. In the newspapers, he is being publicly condemned as a fraud. And when the Reverend is found dead, Faith’s family seems more invested in disguising the possibility that it may have been the result of a suicide than they are in investigating her father’s murder.

The “lie” tree of the title (referred to in the book as “the Mendacity Tree”, a far superior, and Hardinge-y, word) has been brought to the island in secret by the Reverend, and only Faith knows where it is hidden. The tree feeds on lies, absorbing them to produce fruits that give the one who consumes them knowledge. In her quest for the truth, then, Faith finds herself in a horrifying position of power, responsible for a wave of dangerous lies and rumours circulating across the island. In some ways this all feels reminiscent of Hardinge’s last book, the (perfect) Carnegie-shortlisted Cuckoo Song, with its protagonist’s growing realisation and acceptance of the fact that people have the power to hurt other people and that we have to know this about ourselves and find ethical ways to live with it–the major difference, I think, is that Cuckoo Song feels a lot more internal to its protagonist’s head than The Lie Tree does. Faith is an outsider and an observer– though she’s less detached than her own narrative suggests.

That detachment is, perhaps, one of the things that contributes to a general sense of lacking nuance–or perhaps it’s simply the fact that this book is middle-grade and set in a period its readers may need to be educated about. This is most present in the book’s treatment of gender–it’s not enough that we see Faith consistently being valued less by the people around her, or see her mother struggling to survive with the only tool she’s allowed (charm), we must have characters who say things like “a girl cannot be brave, or clever, or skilled as a boy can. If she is not good, she is nothing. Do you understand?” I don’t wish to suggest that no Victorian (or, indeed, no currently living) person would ever utter those words, but for a writer of Hardinge’s quality they feel disappointingly pat. It’s disappointing too because I am still, by inclination, a Victorianist (I seem to have stumbled into twentieth century literary studies by accident), and there’s so much to play with in a setting like this one, with regard to gender and religion and science. The Reverend Sunderly’s actions have stemmed from his growing panic at the ways in which his scientific discoveries and his religious beliefs don’t match up (I’m amazed and disappointed that no reviewers have chosen to title their pieces on this book “Crisis Of Faith”); there are fossils and accounts of weird nineteenth century travel and lady-explorers and women who are in love with other women, and this fantastic gloomy island and all of this should be the perfect fodder for Hardinge, whose prose is always delicious and off-kilter and yet doesn’t quite sparkle as much here as I expect it to.

It has to be said that the individual character notes and relationships are still done really well. Compared to, say, Fire Colour One, The Lie Tree actually does understand, and signal, the gendered power relations embedded in Faith’s initial idolisation of her father and dismissal of her mother. As Faith’s understanding of her situation grows so does her understanding of Myrtle, who may not be the best or most likeable of people, but makes sense. As far as prose, character, and general goodness go I enjoyed The Lie Tree more than anything else on the Carnegie list. But judging Hardinge by her own other works, as far as I’ve read them, this feels less impressive to me.

 

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I’ve been blogging the whole of the Carnegie shortlist for three years now, and in both previous years, even when I’ve been underwhelmed by the shortlists themselves, I’ve had a clear favourite, a book I think is genuinely brilliant, and that I wholeheartedly support. (Neither Liar & Spy in 2014 or Cuckoo Song in 2015 won, incidentally.) This year, that isn’t the case.

My posts on the individual books on this year’s shortlist are in the tag above, but to recap:

I enjoyed Sarah Crossan’s One but am dissatisfied by Crossan’s refusal to produce characters with some depth to them and by the book’s inability to face up to the questions about voyeurism it seems to want to ask; Nick Lake’s There Will Be Lies is mediocre and hates fat people (but that’s okay, I’m willing to hate it back); Patrick Ness’s The Rest of Us Just Live Here is fine I guess (but that’s about it); I found Kate Saunders’s Five Children on the Western Front manipulative and a bit too eager to give me a history lesson (and a lot too willing to leave the empire out of said lesson); Marcus Sedgwick’s Ghosts of Heaven is ambitious in plot and form but doesn’t follow through; I think Robin Talley’s Lies We Tell Ourselves is a good, accomplished book whose flaws unfortunately outweigh its positives; Jenny Valentine’s Fire Colour One just doesn’t hold together and is unthinkingly sexist. I am no fun at parties.

Clearly I should stop doing this, since apparently I just hate all books. But the Carnegie fascinates me; both as a children’s literature academic and as someone who studies empire and national identity. Prizes help make literary culture, and the Carnegie, beginning in 1936, is the British children’s literature canon of the last 80 years, and has fascinating things to say about Postimperial Britain and children’s literature. (And you should absolutely be following Dr Lucy Pearson’s Carnegie Project, here.)

So what have the last three years’ Carnegie shortlists had to say about British children’s literature, other than that the judges and I don’t seem to agree on very much? Well for one, that non-white authors don’t write it. In each of the last three years (and I’d be interested in going back a few more years to see if things are better at any point) the shortlist has been composed entirely of white authors. This year I was so annoyed to see it happen again that I decided I’d read all the books by non-white authors on the nominees list. There are 93 entries on the nominees list. There are 4 books that I know to be by authors who aren’t white– and hopefully some I’ve missed, because those numbers are dismal. The Carnegie shortlist loves talking about race–though as Karen Sands-O’Connor points out here, it seems to prefer it when the whole thing can be conveniently displaced onto America, as with last year’s winner Buffalo Soldier, last year’s shortlist-ee, Ghost Hawk, and this year’s Lies We Tell Ourselves. (Or Australia, in last year’s Middle of Nowhere, or another planet, as with Patrick Ness’s Monsters of Men.) (And the celebration of books like The Child’s Elephant by Rachel Campbell-Johnston and Ghost Hawk by Susan Cooper suggests a reluctance to engage with the ways in which structural racism allows certain books to be published and lauded.)

What else? There’s a general trend towards death and despair, but far too much has been written (and far too many pearls have been clutched) on that subject. This is intertwined with a general privileging of young adult narratives over literature for middle-grade or younger readers, which feels like a shame–this has been a really good few years for middle-grade fiction, and it has been barely acknowledged. Issue Books, to use a reductive term, are also rewarded–there have been books on all three shortlists whose presence feels reducible to what they are About.

And finally, what does this suggest about today’s winner? This year’s shortlist has one added factor thrown in–that The Lie Tree, not content with winning the Costa Children’s Book Award (as Five Children on the Western Front did; and The Ghosts of Heaven was nominated as well), has also won the Costa Book of the Year, i.e. critical acclaim among books written for adults; the judges might need to really love something to knock something with that sort of cultural heft off the top spot.

To me The Lie Tree is the best book on this shortlist, yet I find myself reluctant to wholeheartedly champion it. This goes back to the whole awards-create-literary-culture thing; I don’t want a cultural narrative in which The Lie Tree is a more celebrated book than Cuckoo Song because I value the good things about Cuckoo Song more than the good things about The Lie Tree. Still, it is the best book here, and it’s the one I must throw my weight (take that, Nick Lake) behind.

Given my lack of success in predicting the result in previous years, I suspect this means the winner will be Lies We Tell Ourselves.