Archive for July 4th, 2018

July 4, 2018

June Reading

Almost all of the things I read this month were children’s books (the Carnegie and Little Rebels prize shortlists both contributed to this), and a couple of things I had to stop reading, like Emma Glass’s Peach (I will go back to this, but … not yet, I think), but it was still a better month for reading than I’ve grown to expect over the last couple of years.

 

Henry Lien, Peasprout Chen, Future Legend of Skate and Sword: I’m writing a longer review of this for Strange Horizons, so expect to see it there soon. But: this was a lot of fun. Since I read it I’ve been reading Lien’s other stories set in this world, which add a further layer of complexity, but it works very well as a standalone piece, as a fantasy school story, as an increasingly complex middle-grade novel. I liked it a lot, basically.

Elys Dolan, Mr Bunny’s Chocolate Factory: I didn’t have time to read all of the Little Rebels shortlist this year, but I picked up a few of the books that were on it anyway. This is a picturebook about labour rights in a chocolate egg factory, where the workers are chickens. I’ll be writing about it at length, but as with other children’s books about labour rights, I was disappointed that it didn’t go far enough. No one seems to have the courage to depict the violent overthrow of the system, which is a shame.

Silvia Moreno-Garcia, The Beautiful Ones: This is a historical romance, of the sort we’re all familiar with–awkward debutante, beautiful and sophisticated older woman, intriguing self-made man who has travelled to parts of the world that seem strange and exotic to his own people. It’s also a fantasy because of the setting–another world, but with fashions and social mores drawn from our own 19th century (Moreno-Garcia describes it as inspired by the Belle Époque)–and because some people in this world, including two of the protagonists, have telekinetic powers. The fantasy is perhaps the least interesting part of this story–it’s never very clear to me that the world is significantly altered by the presence of telekinesis, and all it does is give Antonina and Hector something in common; references to the larger, alternate geography are intriguing, but the plot doesn’t give us much opportunity to explore. I’m not sure that matters though, because the relationships do work. If this is a romance, it’s a conflicted one–do we accept Hector’s reform because Nina does? And what Hector feels for Nina may be very wonderful, but at some level the book knows it’s not the same thing as what he felt for Valerie and the difference may matter someday. There’s a yearny, bittersweet undertone to all of this; it’s a little bit Barbara Pym. Which is not a comparison I thought I’d be making when I started out. (The Les Liaisons Dangereuses comparison, which everyone has made, is also accurate.)

Geraldine McCaughrean, Where the World Ends: Several words on this (excellent) book here; it has since won the Carnegie medal.

Patrick Ness, Release: Several words on this book here.

Zanib Mian, The Muslims: This won the Little Rebels award, and I enjoyed it very much; I was interested particularly in how directly it addresses islamophobia and racism in the UK by building them into the book’s structure: the title, for example, is derived from a bigoted neighbour’s constant references to what sinister activities “the Muslims” are up to (she does learn to like them, but there’s a hint that her acceptance of these racially-other neighbours doesn’t extend to other communities). Since reading the book, I’ve also used it in a class (about antiracist activism, children’s literature, and illustrations) with some school students, who were intrigued by it. I’ll be writing about it separately soon.

Claudia Rankine and Beth Loffreda, The Racial Imaginary: I was looking for a particular piece in this collection (it turned out to be one of Loffreda’s own entries), and ended up reading the whole thing, almost straight through, over a couple of days. It wasn’t the ideal way to read the collection, which I’d only dipped in and out of previously; but there are a few pieces in there (Bhanu Kapil!) that stood out to me despite my fire-hose approach to reading it.