Archive for February 13th, 2018

February 13, 2018

January Reading

In January I packed up the entire last few years of my life, moved continents, did visa paperwork for a short trip to America, and drafted an article. I did not read many books, but honestly I’m impressed that I read any:

 

John Agard and Satoshi Kitamura, The Young Inferno: I’ve made some notes on this, and will be writing about it at greater length soon, probably. It’s a smart, and slyly clever retelling of Dante; the deviations in form make sense for several good reasons (especially the switch from Virgil to Aesop as a guide for a young boy); Kitamura’s art is always great.

 

Sofia Samatar, The Winged Histories: Reading A Stranger in Olondria a few years ago, I said (unoriginally, probably) that “stranger” was the important word–that this is, fundamentally, the story of an outsider to the fantastic word, and one whose relationship to that world has been mediated through text. This companion novel is almost the opposite of that one in that its protagonists are very much the insiders to this world–thought they’re all women, and forced to negotiate particular restrictions, not only have they grown up within reach of the Olondrian empire’s metropolitan centre, but three of the four women have been among or close to those who make the major decisions that shape this world. In a sense they’re even greater insiders to the narrative than if Samatar had decided to include a sort of Olondrian Man-on-the-Street; the rather confusing civil war that is the background to Jevick’s visit is of their making. Because it’s an insider’s perspective, this book widens and deepens what we know about Olondria’s internal functioning (and internal empire). Unsurprisingly, this is also a book about books–how texts live in the world, and how they live with one another.

I’ll be discussing this book, along with two others, with Maureen and Jonah, so less superficial thoughts to come.

 

Deepak Unnikrishnan, Temporary People: Also read for the above discussion, and because this is a book about which I was excited. A collection of short, fantastical stories set in the Gulf, usually among Malayali migrant workers, it’s necessarily a fragmented narrative–but one where the individual stories bounce off each other, and off what the reader already knows about this immigrant community, to gradually build up and layer a larger story. In its multilingualism and the sort of detached understanding of what narratives the reader already has access to as well as the stories it wants to tell, it reminds me a little of (the in all other ways completely different) Ghalib Islam’s Fire in the Unnameable Country. It’s good, it’s formally interesting, I’m glad it is winning prizes. (Am I allowed to quietly boast that I shared a TOC with Unnikrishnan once?)

 

Stephanie Burgis, Snowspelled: I started writing about this and it turned into a seperate post (or half of one; I’ve been lazy recently) so I guess that’ll be here soon? Spoiler alert: I’m being conflicted about regency romance again.