June Reading

Is this going to be another of those months where I disapprove of things? (Yes)

 

Elizabeth McKenzie, The Portable Veblen: I promised a friend I’d attend at least one of her Bailey’s prize shadowing book group sessions, and picked the last one largely because of this book. I’d seen it compared to Karen Joy Fowler’s work (which I love), there was an approving Ursula Le Guin blurb, and various other enthusiastic reviews (including this one from Jeff Vandermeer). It was probably inevitable that I’d be disappointed, and I was, a bit–as a social novel, with lots of exaggeratedly horrible characters, The Portable Veblen is successful; as the sort of thing that KJF does, it is not. I liked its joyous, over-the-top-ness, I liked every moment of Veblen and Paul attempting to figure out how to be those two people in a relationship; reading it against Hannah Rothschild’s The Improbability of Love (also for the abovementioned book group) I enjoyed the ways in which it was big and sweeping and comic in ways that felt stronger than Rothschild’s own invocation of those things. But at moments where I’d have wanted it to be weird it was twee, I wanted it to do more with its Thorstein Veblen references, and Veblen herself in particular embodies a particular sort of precious, whimsical whiteness that I’m strongly put off by. I feel more kindly disposed towards it than Abigail Nussbaum does here, but the comparison with Where’d You Go Bernadette?, which I hadn’t thought of, rings disappointingly true to me.

Patrick Ness, The Rest Of Us Just Live Here: Many (many) words on this here.

Marcus Sedgwick, The Ghosts of Heaven: Many words on this here. Both this and the Ness were a part of my Carnegie shortlist shadowing project.

Garth Nix, Goldenhand: Nix was in my city for a conference and I got to interview him (forthcoming from Strange Horizons!) and also to wheedle an ARC of the next Old Kingdom book out of him–and since I’d just reread the series for the interview, and have been a fan of the Old Kingdom since the 1990s, obviously I stayed up all night and read it immediately. I have many thoughts, but am saving them for a proper review in a couple of months.

Anna Breslaw, Scarlett Epstein Hates it Here: I seem to know a lot of people who deeply loved Rainbow Rowell’s Fangirl (which is about a young woman who writes very successful fanfic) and have generally attributed the fact that it does nothing for me to my general lack of engagement with fandom. Breslaw’s book is also about a BNF in a fictional fandom but is so clumsy in its engagement with fan culture that it makes me appreciate Rowell’s book a lot more. Scarlett is a fan of a teenage werewolf drama, which is cancelled at the beginning of the book. Undaunted, Scarlett and her friends in fandom (the most popular writers) decide to keep writing fic set in this universe anyway. Scarlett makes this an excuse to write thinly-/not-at-all disguised versions of her schoolmates into a weird RPF that features a) sexbots and b) no werewolves at all and for some reason, rather than turning away in vague embarrassment the fandom decides to embrace this setting and it grows popular enough for there to be ship wars. Naturally, the principal characters (the Mean Girl who is the basis for the main sexbot, the popular boy Scarlett has a crush on) find out and things blow up.

There are the bones of a good book in this–Scarlett’s initial idolisation of her father’s Cultured-ness (vs her mother’s lack thereof), the ways this maps on to her assumptions about who is and is not culturally valuable, these make for thoughtful, nuanced character portraits, and I think the book is reaching for exactly this. But it’s awkward in its relationship to and unnecessary explanations of fandom (and what on earth is that moment when Scarlett is surprised that a writer of m/m slash is a woman???), trite in its discussion of middle-aged white man fiction (to make me want to defend Jonathan Franzen is quite a feat), just generally unimpressive.

 

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