Of Interest (5 June, 2016)

I suppose I could have organised this week’s Sunday Reading links by theme, but nah.

 

Two important things by Sara Ahmed this week. First, a piece on her recent resignation from Goldsmiths, sexual harrassment, institutions and the archive. Then from a couple of days earlier, this, on progressive racism and racism as a structuring force in progressive movements.

[Reading the two pieces together is instructive; particularly when Ahmed says, in the piece on progressive racism, “The response to a challenge of diversity of the University takes the form of a statement of how the university promotes diversity.  Indeed, diversity as a form of good practice (One World Week, Black History Month) is used as evidence that there is not a problem with a lack of diversity.” Goldsmiths’ response to the incidents that led to Ahmed’s resignation almost appears to have been written to this guideline; it’s remarkable.]

 

Hannah Black on the workings of “identity politics”.

Carmen Maria Machado watches a stranger maybe write a novel.

Scott Long on the meaning (and elevation, and not) of marriage.

At Strange Horizons, Portia Subran, Kevin Jared Hosein and Brent Ryan Bellamy discuss the works of Nalo Hopkinson.

Muhammad Ali watches Rocky II with Roger Ebert.

I’ll be glad when Game of Thrones thinkpiece season is at an end, but this piece by Lili Loofbourow says some great things about the narrative incoherence of the show when it strays from family drama. [I squeaked with joy at 'we extend these incidents conspiratorial credit ("what happened to Hodor was terribly sad and clearly brilliant — we'll find out why soon").']

Iona Sharma on learning Gaelic and re-learning Hindi. Via about half the people I know (how weird and great to see someone you know in one context being ‘discovered’ by people you know in a different context.)

Camalita Naicker on passing as Indian in India, Africa in the Indian imaginary, and shared forgotten histories.

And while on the subject of anti-African (and anti-black) racism in India, a news story on multiple recent instances of mob violence and another on a forgotten African past in India.

Snigdha Poonam’s great (and terrifying) story on children in Kota IIT-preparation institutes killing themselves. (Avoid the comments unless painfully misguided how-not-to-feel-suicidal advice particularly amuses you.)

Most people have by now read this statement by the woman who was raped by Brock Turner, but it’s powerful and direct and horrifying. (Trigger warning for some graphic, detailed descriptions.)

Siddharth Varadarajan on the aftermath of the Gulberg society massacre.

 

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