Archive for April, 2015

April 27, 2015

The Little Rebels Children’s Book Award Shortlist (Part I)

I’m blogging the Carnegie shortlist again this year (eventually), but thought it would be fun to do the Little Rebels award as well. Eight books, of which these are the first four. I’ve read most of the shortlist–I’ll be writing about the next four in the next week or so.

 

Anne Booth, Girl with a White Dog

A children-learning-about-WWII-and-the-importance-of-tolerance story. That’s a bit reductive, though it is essentially accurate.

Jessie is in year 9, and is learning about World War II as part of a class project. Her father works abroad, something which, hearing the adults around her talk, Jessie blames on immigrants coming to the UK and taking all the jobs. Her grandmother adopts a white German Shepherd, but falls ill soon after (and keeps saying things that make no sense), so that Jessie has to look after the puppy. Eventually her grandmother’s mysterious past, her history project, the cousin Fran’s group of bullies and her best friend Kate’s activism all link up.

There are things here that really work. I’m wary of the collapsing of historical and current events into an overarching argument that these are all manifestations of the same terrible impulses, but Booth gives us enough specifics to partially offset this. The framing project about fairy tales also works—the “modern fairy tale” that Jessie writes for homework is blatant, but still clever. Her voice is funny and dry. And there’s a dark undercurrent to that voice that is the result of her anti-immigrant prejudice, which lasts for a good portion of the book.

I suppose my major issue with Girl with a White Dog is how issue-book-y it feels, which is perhaps an unfair criticism to make of something that is quite openly an issue book. Lessons are stated to us directly—when Jessie has a revelation about prejudice, or about some parallel between the issues she’s reading about and those she’s facing, we are told what it is immediately. And her group of friends is a little too pat—I want to see more kids of colour, queer kids, disabled kids, kids with different sorts of families represented in children’s lit but the particular structure of this plot, and the way it wants to link up various sorts of prejudice, unfortunately enhances the sense of issues being ticked off a list with the introduction of particular characters who all deserve more.

Having said which, a thing that is very well done is Jessie’s relationship with her best friend, Kate. Kate is fond of Jessie’s grandmother as well, is good at maths and speaking to people, is in a wheelchair and plays sitting volleyball at the national level, is very, very political and activisty—Jessie feels vaguely guilty that she isn’t more politically aware, as I suspect most of us do, but consoles herself with the knowledge that not everyone can be good at everything (as I suspect most of us do) and this is Kate’s thing. But then this exchange takes place:

Eventually I stuttered, ‘But … but you won that fight with the bus company. You were in the local paper and everything. It was brilliant. You were brilliant. I thought you liked campaigning.

‘Not campaigning all the time! I want to be lazy, to be nice like you, instead of good old campaigning Kate. And, right now, I just want to be alone, Jess. You’re really not helping.’ And Kate wheeled herself off as fast as she could down the corridor away from me.

I’m quoting this here in part because wanting to be able to be nice is such a simple, painfully accurate description of that feeling. But I think in this book, at this point, it’s a little more important than that. The rest of Girl with a White Dog will be about forgiveness and reconciliation and recognising that we, like other people, are implicated in badness. But this moment between Jessie and Kate isn’t resolved; we’re not allowed to believe that there’s some form of the right words that could make this thing between them go away. I don’t mean to say that they’re not still best friends; if anything, they’re probably more so. But Girl with a White Dog allows Kate her bitterness and perhaps suggests that anger is justified and can sit alongside nobler things like forgiveness.

 

 

Craig Pomranz and Margaret Chamberlain, Made by Raffi 

Made by Raffi is about a boy (Raffi) who likes clothes and bright colours and doesn’t like the things that his other classmates seem to, and who worries about what this might say about his gender identity. Then a teacher teaches him how to knit, and he makes a giant stripey rainbow scarf for his dad, who doesn’t seem to mind that it’s about four metres long. He also makes a magnificent cape for the prince character in the school play, impressing everyone at school, so that both friends and family are shown to embrace his creativity.

raffiGood things: Rainbow scarf! The world illustrated by Chamberlain is a fundamentally nice one; Raffi’s school is populated with students and teachers of various ethnicities and degrees of able-bodiedness, girls who play the same sports as boys and girls who don’t (the boys are a bit less diverse in this regard, for obvious plot-reasons) mum and dad both help out in the kitchen, and the only obvious questioning of Raffi’s behaviour comes from Raffi himself. Even where Pomranz’s text tells us that some children on the bus teased Raffi for his knitting, the accompanying image is one of people who are happy and interested (and the scarf, which is really far too long to be practical). And I like that this isn’t a book about queerness and/or gender identity—though the rainbow scarf would make that reading easy—Raffi might well find that he’s queer, or genderqueer (he does ask if there’s such a thing as a “Tomgirl”) but he might easily be a straight, cis kid who likes to make things. All sorts of options are available here. And I really like the spread in which we’re shown how he makes the cape, as if this was an activity book.

Bad things: that this book can be easily summed up in terms of good and bad things that it does, and that so many of the “good” ones (not enforcing restrictive assumptions on people’s bodies, hurrah!) are about avoiding problems that other books have fallen into. It all feels a bit bland, and I can’t imagine really, really wanting to give the book to a child.

 

 

Jessica Shepherd, Grandma

Oscar and his grandmother are really close, do a number of activities together and love each other dearly. But Grandma is increasingly suffering from dementia and eventually has to go into a care home, and Oscar must adjust to this change.

Grandma is a picture book, told ostensibly in Oscar’s voice and in a constant present tense that makes it feel like a log book or a diary with gaps between the entries to represent the time between Grandma’s first signs of the condition, her diagnosis, the decision to take her to a care home, the point at which she moves in.

It’s all very simply told, and Oscar’s an unnervingly sweet child. He’s sad when Grandma doesn’t remember him or snaps at him, but we’re not shown any anger, or bitterness at how unfair the situation is for her as well as for him, or really any negative emotion—even his sadness is visible only to be followed with immediate reassurance that she doesn’t really mean it. It’s a deliberate choice for an author to make and I can see why one would. But I do wonder if, alongside its demystifying of dementia, it falls into a sort of telling children what the proper way to react is, rather than giving their own feelings a place to go. (I’m thirty and I have unpraiseworthy feelings over dementia and how it has affected elderly people I love; Oscar’s, what, five?) But that’s the thing, it is about demystifying old age and illness, not about demystifying children’s feelings towards these. On the back cover we’re told that Shepherd’s book “has grown out of her experience in a variety of caring roles” and the story ends with a Q&A about dementia, which rather makes my point for me.

But then there’s the genuinely moving bit where Oscar gets Grandma to tell him stories about herself. “I know them all by heart, so that I can remind her if she forgets one day” (there’s a whole world in that sentence). And the art is rather nice and I love that Grandma, Oscar, and Oscar’s younger sibling all have the same sort of hair.

My real objection to the book has to do with Grandma’s hair though. We’re told that Grandma likes to dress up as she used to do, and that she “loves it when Dad brushes her long, curly hair”. I may have howled a “noooooo” and I think that I was justified in doing so. I’m going to speculate that the author has straight hair.

 

 

Chris Haughton, Shh! We Have a Plan 

As has previously been revealed on this website, I love Haughton’s work. The art is just astonishingly cute, the text is often deadpan funny. It is probably unsurprising that I loved this one as well.

Four people (the promotional material says “friends”, but they all look similar and are clearly all looking after the smallest, so who knows?) are walking through the forest and see a bird.

The smallest doesn’t seem to be in on the plan. The others get into position to capture it, and then they “tip-toe slowly tip-toe slowly” (this book is so much fun to read aloud—later they try “climbing slowly climbing slowly” and “paddling slowly paddling slowly”) till they’re near enough to pounce. Three failures later they are somewhat battered and bruised and drenched and nowhere near success. Meanwhile the smallest has offered the bird some bread and gathered a huge flock around him. The others seem ready to take advantage of their companion’s friendliness and catch a few birds for themselves, but the flock turns on them and they have to run away.

So much of this works because of the art. We’re not told why it is that these characters want to catch this bird—are they hoping to eat it? Sell it? Keep it at home? It doesn’t matter. Colour plays a big role, I think; the pink and orange of the bird (and later the yellows and greens of the other birds), shining out against this twilight, purple and blue landscape, is pure desire.

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I’m most of the way through the Little Rebels shortlist now and as I continue to write about them I can see words like “preachy”, “didactic”, “issue” coming up over and over. This is something that is, I think, built into the structure of a prize like this—if we go out looking for “books informed by inclusive/anti-discriminatory concerns or those which promote social equality or social justice” these are inevitable. And while I may sound impatient with this at times, I do think that finding and celebrating these books is worthwhile.

But they’re not the only form that such literature can take, and I think something like Haughton’s book is a useful reminder of that. Is it radical because the prey turns on the hunters? Is it radical because the one member of the group to have any success is the smallest? Is it radical because the smallest seems to be motivated by friendliness/kindness? All of those, but they don’t strike me as more fundamental to the book than that it is funny and beautiful and completely charming.

April 20, 2015

Elephants? Feminism? Something.

wen hsu elephant 2Some recent (and very cute) children’s books involving elephants. I think the essence of this column is that elephants are a) adorable and b) fun to draw?

 

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“Not so long ago” a King decides that he wants to know the weight of his pet elephant. Unfortunately, the kingdom doesn’t have the necessary elephant-weighing technology in place, and no one is entirely sure what to do. Various groups of people try to work it out—fruit sellers and jewellers find their weighing machines inadequate, while the rope makers who try to rig up some sort of pulley system find that their ropes just aren’t strong enough. Bureaucrats and scientists fail. Finally a little girl comes up with the solution—to put the elephant in a boat and measure the change in water level, fill the boat with stones until the same effect was achieved, and then weigh the stones.wen hsu elephant 3 CUTEST

It’s a story many of us will have come across before in some form or the other. Geeta Dharmarajan’s version How to Weigh an Elephant, illustrated by Wen Hsu, names the little girl Lilavati and in doing so opens up the possibility that this is the historical Lilavati, the daughter of Bhaskaracharya to whom his Lilavati is addressed. History doesn’t tell us whether Lilavati herself grew up to be a mathematician, but she has often been adopted as a symbol for women in science in India—a 2008 anthology about Indian women scientists is titled Lilavati’s Daughters, for example. Dharmarajan’s book ends with a section on neglected Indian women scientists as well, signalling clearly that it sees books like this one as having an important social role to play.

The “twins” in the title of Kavitha Mandana and Nayantara Surendranath’s A Pair of Twins share neither parents nor a species but they do share a birthday. (Human) Sundari is born on the same day as (elephant) Lakshmi, into a family of Mahouts. The two babies form a lasting friendship and Sundari often pretends to be a Mahout on Lakshmi’s back—but in secret, because being a mahout is a job for a man. Until the Dussehra procession, when the usual elephant is unwell and only Lakshmi can take his place; with Sundari on her back, of course. A Pair of Twins is ‘about’ gender in ways that How to Weigh an Elephant is not; a longer text for slightly older children, it addresses the harm of both masculine and feminine stereotypes. Sundari’s brother would rather be a musician than a mahout, Sundari would prefer not to have to dress up as a man in order to do the job she has finally been allowed to do.

PoT1Both Dharmarajan and Mandana’s texts are helped by some gorgeous illustrations. Wen Hsu’s work won a Katha Chitrakala award in 2011 and uses cut paper and unlikely colours to great effect (and great adorableness). Nayantara Surendranath restricts herself to a more limited palette of browns and creams and pinks with the occasional bolt of blue. Her art is full of detail: the lines on tree bark, the print on a piece of cloth, be it part of a dress, a curtain or a howdah. Where there are no details she adds them in so that plain surfaces become unlikely things of beauty. And the limited palette serves at least one important purpose; when Sundari, having won all her battles, shows up to take her place as the leader of the parade in a very feminine turquoise blue dancer’s sari (turquoise is the book’s word for it but it seems a pity not to use the vastly more appropriate “ferozi”) the image bursts out from the page.

pot2It’s not clear whether elephants have anything to do with the fact that these two books for young readers are strongly feminist. It’s tempting to come up with a theory; popular science suggests that elephant herds are largely matriarchal societies, and that might have something to do with it. As with most things, the true answer probably lies in the fact that elephants are very cute, but that needn’t stop us from speculating.

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I didn’t have room here to also talk about An Elephant in my Backyard by Shobha Viswanath and Sadhvi Jawa (and that book isn’t really about gender in any way more obvious than that it has a girl for a protagonist) but it might deserve a separate post soon.

April 11, 2015

Newcastle: Eclipse

There was a solar eclipse a couple of weeks ago! It was very exciting. British media kept warning people about not permanently damaging their eyesight, Newcastle locals huddled together to look at the sky and tremble, Niall yelled at clouds (I may be exaggerating slightly), and I indulged in some occidentalism.

(Here is a column)

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In the power of a primitive and barbaric ruler Allan Quatermain and his companions need some way of getting the other inhabitants of the kingdom onto their side, escaping execution and putting the rightful heir on the throne. One of Quatermain’s companions, John Good, carries an almanac which lists important celestial activity—including a conveniently timed (lunar, in this case) eclipse.

HaggardI can no longer remember whether H. Rider Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines was the first time I encountered the story of the educated Europeans who use their superior knowledge of astronomy to their advantage in this way. I also have no way of knowing whether it is the earliest iteration of this trope—one of the things that makes the book so enduringly entertaining is the fact that it is the perfect storm of adventure story clichés so that only the most unsullied reader could come to it without the sense that she had seen a lot of this before. There’s a hidden kingdom in Africa with an unknowably ancient past, a corrupt usurper, a prince with a birthmark that proves his royal status, a beautiful native girl who must be saved from becoming a human sacrifice (and who will fall in love with a white man because if nineteenth century fiction teaches us anything it is that white Europeans are irresistible). But most important are the credulous natives for whom the ability to recognise an eclipse is proof of supernatural power.

They're wearing PITH HELMETS, ffsIn Enid Blyton’s The Secret Mountain a family is kidnapped by the sun-worshipping inhabitants of a hollowed out mountain, also in an unidentified part of Africa. Once again a diary containing information about an eclipse saves the day (another life lesson from this genre seems to be that of always carrying a diary of some sort on one’s adventures); the father hurls a well-timed knife at the sun and the world gradually goes dark. Then there’s Herge’s Tintin adventure, The Prisoners of the Sun, which sets a version of this story in Peru and has its main characters captured by the  worshipers of an Inca sun god (the comic’s research fidelity to Inca myth is dubious to say the least). Tintin has NOT had the good sense to bring some form of celestial calendar with him, and it’s only owing to the merest coincidence that he happens to find a scrap of newspaper that happens to  mention the eclipse that is soon to take place. Once again the sky is darkened and everyone panics except the smug Europeans who alone know what’s happening.

If it seems a bit unlikely that all these native cultures should have spent thousands of years worshipping celestial bodies without figuring out that occasionally eclipses happen, that’s because it is. European adventure fiction oscillates wildly between the conviction that the natives are primitive and ignorant and the worry that they’ve been around a while and might know stuff. As ever it’s that man of science, Professor Calculus, who knows that something is amiss. As his companions look smugly upon the terrified crowd he (under the misapprehension that this is all a play) praises their acting.  Even Calculus has seen or read this story too many times to think it’s really real.

tintin eclipse 1 tintin eclipse 2

A couple of weeks ago I stood with a crowd of people in the middle of a city watching the sun disappear. You wouldn’t think this would be an unusual sight in the north of England, but it was quite an Event, with a screen set up by a local observatory in case the clouds should, er, obscure the sun. Fists were shaken heavenwards at any passing clouds that dared. Eventually the skies darkened even by local standards; there was something eerie about the quality of the light. Perhaps the gods were angry.

And then it passed, and the light was normal again, and the natives cheered.

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April 9, 2015

A Terry Pratchett post

I thought I wasn’t going to do a Terry Pratchett column (as I learnt after Leonard Nimoy died last month, I’m not good at talking about why certain public figures meant a lot to me) but then realised I couldn’t not say something.

So, this.

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At some point in my mid-teens a friend from school lent me a copy of something called The Light Fantastic, by someone called Terry Pratchett. It was the sequel to a book neither of us had read, which was a pity, but there was enough in there that we recognised to make this book, both a perpetuation and a parody of fantasy tropes, fun. I borrowed the book and loved it, she moved to another school, then another city, and we lost touch for years before Facebook made communication possible again, I kept the book. I found that there were others.kirby discworld

If parodying fantasy tropes had been the only purpose of the books, I suspect the joke would have worn thin very quickly (and reading the early books as an adult, I can see that it often did). But the Discworld books widened and deepened into something larger and deeper; while never losing the sense that a good portion of a book could be dedicated to the fulfilment of a terrible pun and that that was as noble a goal as any. In the first few years I read them in the order that I found them in, skipping back and forth in an already-chaotic timeline and across British and American editions. When I’d read all that had been published I moved on to making sure I had a complete set in the editions with the nicer covers (if there was a Josh Kirby cover, that was the one I wanted; a British edition was always preferable to an American one). As I caught up, I began collecting the books in hardback, as they came out, which was usually (serendipitously!) around my birthday. Friends in other countries would pick them up if they were delayed in India, or stood in line to get them signed. For years now I’ve associated the whole process of growing older with the arrival of a new Terry Pratchett book—I’m not entirely sure how to do that, now that there will be no more.

When I found out that Pratchett had died last week, it was through friends whom I’d badgered into reading him in college, messaging me to ask if I knew and to thank me for introducing his work to them.  I dithered over emailing my old friend and expressing the same sort of gratitude–I’m not sure “thanks for letting me steal your book fifteen years ago” is something I can articulate very well to someone who is now almost a stranger. But I am, deeply, grateful.

And I’m grateful to Pratchett, and to the books (particularly the Discworld books) themselves. For a world in which the insides of people’s heads (our second and third thoughts as well as our first) are important. For Granny Weatherwax’s ventures into Headology; for Sam Vimes who creates a policeman in his own subconscious to keep a check on his anger*.

I suggest above that the earliest books in the series are slight parodies, but they were still enormously important to me. You can’t think about why things are the way they are until you notice that they’re that way in the first place; Pratchett is one of a few writers who taught me how to read, and read critically. Eventually I’d turn that gaze on his own books—he gave me the tools to be dissatisfied with his work. I’m grateful for that as well.

But most of all I’m grateful for how kind the books are. One of the reasons that I find the books’ social commentary occasionally unsatisfying is that some things simply can’t be done nicely, however strong the author’s feelings or sharp his commentary. But kindness is safe, and warm and human (almost everyone’s human in Pratchett). Earlier this year, after a death in the family (not, alas, a Death in the family, though Pratchett’s Death might be the most human of all) I spent a couple of days in my parents’ house just reading Discworld books under a blanket.

I might need to do that again this week.

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*Vimes remains my favourite Discworld character, even though the correct answer to that question is Granny Weatherwax, precisely because of that anger. It has been vital to me–and it was only in the weeks following the author’s death that I realised how many people I know for whom this is true.

April 2, 2015

March Reading

I’ve been bad at reading this last few months but March wasn’t so bad.

 

Zen Cho, Spirits Abroad: I’m reviewing this elsewhere and will post the piece here when it’s out, but the important revelation that I had about Zen Cho (other than that her work is brilliant comfort reading) is that she reminds me of Joan Aiken. I’m not sure there’s a higher compliment.

Deji Bryce Olukotun, Nigerians in Space: For a review. I will not be counting this in my stats for the year because it’s a reread; it’s worth reminding the world that it’s great, though.

Kavitha Mandana, Nayantara Surendranath, A Pair of Twins: I’ll have a piece on this up in a couple of weeks. Feminism and elephants and excellent art.

Shobha Viswanath, Sadhvi Jawa, An Elephant in My Backyard: I also liked this very much, for reasons that will remain mysterious until next week’s column is republished on the blog.

Danez Smith, [insert] boy: I discovered Danez Smith’s work a few months ago, when Sridala linked me to “Not an Elegy for Mike Brown” (at Split This Rock, but I’m linking to Buzzfeed because that way you also get  “alternate names for black boys”) and was broken by it in the best way. I read this collection in bits over the month and it may not have been the wisest choice for a fragile time, and I’m still trying to work out how to talk about it because I’m quite sure I need to. But you should read it.

Alan Garner, Red Shift: For a Strange Horizons book club discussion (with some of my favourite people) which you can find here.

Haruki Murakami, The Strange Library: I wrote about this here.

Gail Carriger, Prudence (The Custard Protocol): I’m going to have to write something longer on this because it’s set in steampunk-supernatural colonial India and almost does some clever things and then … does so many other things which are not so much “clever” as “terrible”.

Kazuo Ishiguro, The Buried Giant: I’m discussing this elsewhere and will be posting a link when that’s up, but rarely have I seen so many critics so confused by something that doesn’t fit an expected shape. And yet it’s not that strange.