August Reading

… which sounds entirely different from what it is meant to signify: the books I read in August.

There were not many of them; between conventions in London and conference-planning in Newcastle the only time I read at all was on trains. But I did manage to read a few things.

 

Robert Galbraith, The Silkworm: I’ve seen some positive reviews of this book that treat its portrayal of the publishing industry and its books within the book as revelatory, and I feel like I might be missing something? I did genuinely enjoy it though.

Diana Wynne Jones, Dark Lord of Derkholm, The Year of the Griffin, Howl’s Moving Castle, The Tough Guide to Fantasyland: I was involved in a Diana Wynne Jones conference that was to take place at the beginning of September (that it is now over is the only reason I’m able to post this thing now). I reread The Tough Guide and Dark Lord of Derkholm for my own paper, The Year of the Griffin because having reread DLoD I thought I might as well (and also it’s just good), Howl’s Moving Castle because I was moderating a panel about the adaptation to film (and would also be seeing the film for the first time in a long while). I feel that the proper response to weeks of thinking about the conference ought to be to not want to think about Jones for a while. Instead, I find myself contemplating a complete reread.

Rainbow Rowell, Landline: I wrote about this here.

Nick Harkaway, Tigerman: Tigerman offers so much to unpack and play with that it’s the sort of thing that critics ought to love. And so much of it looks so obvious and over-drawn, and then the whole is salvaged by quiet, individual moments that have quite a lot of emotional power. I’ll be discussing this elsewhere at length, but for now I’m very glad it exists.

Bhajju Shyam, The London Jungle Book: I wrote about this here.

C.S. Lewis, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader, The Silver Chair, The Horse and His Boy, The Magician’s Nephew, The Last Battle: I have reached the Narnia and Postcolonialism bit of my thesis and there is far too much to work with.

Georgette Heyer, Regency Buck: I needed Heyer, because I was exhausted with moving, and this was all there was. It’s very far from being my favourite of her works, and I’d forgotten how irritating the main characters are. The Beau Brummel cameo is still great though.

 

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